Solution Performance

Discover the Benefits

  • New imaging tissue map techniques require much faster processing which enables easier result analysis bypassing a computational bottleneck. This translates into a rapid assessment of recognizing injury signs (not possible with MRI) from concussion.

  • Additionally, this aids studies of children at risk of developing autism spectrum disorder, with the goal of developing effective interventions and treatment.

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Diffusion Compartment Imaging (DCI) is a new computational imaging technique that constructs a spatial map of brain tissue microstructure & connectivity from diffusion weighted magnetic resonance imaging scans.

Provides new insight into brain injury and atypical maturation of brain connectivity in autism spectrum disorder.

Infos sur le produit et ses performances

1

DCI: Workloads: denoised_diff.nhdr w/o slices and --box parameters – full run. Test performed in January’18.

Intel® Xeon® processor E5-2697 v4: 2S Intel® Xeon® processor E5-2697 v4, 2.3 GHz (Turbo ON), 18 Cores/Socket, 36 Cores (total), 72 Threads (HT on), DDR4 8x16GB 2400 MHz, BIOS 86B0271.R00, Motherboard Wildcat Pass, BMC 1.33.9832, FRU/SDR package 1.09, Red Hat 7.2 kernel 3.10.0-327.el7.x86_64, System Disk 1 1.0 TB SATA drive WD1003FZEX-00MK2A0, coprocessor N/A. Compiler option “-xCORE-AVX2”.

Intel® Xeon® Gold 6148 processor: Executed with 80 threads. 2S Intel® Xeon® Gold 6148 processor, 2.4GHz, 40 cores, turbo on, HT on, BIOS 86B.01.00.0412.R00, 12x16GB 2666MHz DDR, Red Hat Enterprise Linux* 7.2 kernel 3.10.0-327. Compiler option “-xCORE-AVX2”.

Intel® Xeon® Platinum 8180 processor: Executed with 112 threads. 2S Intel® Xeon® Platinum 8180 processor, 2.5GHz, 56 cores, turbo on, HT on, BIOS 86B.01.00.0412.R00, 12x16GB 2666MHz DDR, Red Hat Enterprise Linux* 7.2 kernel 3.10.0-327. Compiler option “-xCORE-AVX2”.

2Performance results are based on testing as of January 2018 and may not reflect all publicly available security updates. See configuration disclosure for details. No product can be absolutely secure.